Tag Archives: design

introducing the 8’5″ EDB “garbage picker”

this is a new EDB variant that I shaped with Sunset Cliffs in mind, particularly North Garbage. Consider the paddle out to the line up. It sure is nice to have something that glides. Once you’re out though, it’s nice to be on something other than a log to take advantage of the quality of the surf. And remember the feeling of hearing “OUTSIDE” and knowing that you have to cover some ground, FAST. I feel this is the perfect combination of traits for the Cliffs. I could envision catching anything from knee high inside sliders in the summer, to outside double overhead bombers on this thing. Can’t wait to try it out. Available soon at Bird’s.

8'5" garbage picker IMG_1689

New boards on the way!.

Great trip. Got a lot of tattooing in at Avalon Tattoo, almost finishing two ongoing projects and meeting some nice new folks.

The interview with Takashi and Junko from Blue Magazine in Japan went very well I think. They were very professional and nice folks. I’m looking forward to their interview in an upcoming issue. Unfortunately Blue is not published in English at this time so I’ll be hitting up one of my Japanese friends for translation.

I’ve got boards working up on the hill at Bing (formerly Channin) and at Michael Miller’s. Here’s the line up of new stock on the way:

6’2″ arctail quad downrailer: insane Mexican blanket resin top in fall colors, Fins 101 bamboo canard quads glassed on, resin leash loop.

6’7″ HPH Speedster: cool aqua/smoke stripe over tail, Geppy #1 keels, glass leash loop.

7’6″ hillbilly quad round tail: light olive tint bottom, Geppy/Frye quads glassed on, satin gloss finish.

9’7″ HPH: “beetlejuice” smoke/opaque white jailbreak stripes top and bottom, Geppy #2 keels glassed on, resin leash loop.

Thanks to Larry and Robert for their orders. They’ll be done soon fella’s

Hullls

displacement or planing?

I see a lot of traffic on the net these days looking for hulls. I’m am by no means an expert on surfboard design, but I am an avid student of design and have researched a fair amount. Here is some of what I’ve learned.

Although the recent fascination with hulls has centered around the Greg Liddle “modified transitional displacement hulls”, any surfboard can be considered a hull. There are displacement hulls, planing hulls and as usually is the case, some variant of the two.

As soon as you put an edge at the tail of your board you have created a planing hull. The very nature of the release provided by that edge, by definition puts that board into planing mode. It the edge were left soft and round, you still have a displacement hull. Now whether it is a good one of either type is another matter.

Have you ever seen the old footage of guys towing behind motor boats on their logs? As soon as they get going, the tail end of the board starts submarining and they can literally walk to the nose and go. This demonstrates a the principle of displacement hull theory. A displacement hull has a theoretical hull speed, above which the water actually sucks the hull deeper into the water (I’m simplifying here). Take a sailboat or any other displacement hull and tow it. At anything above the theoretical hull speed, the boat begins to submarine, actually being pulled deeper into the water. Old, soft edged boards are the same, as are any true displacement hulls being produced today. As soon as you put an edge at the tail, you release the water and the board begins to plane. The modern surfboard, most “hulls” included, balance these principles to achieve the desired effect or feel.

Now I’m sure I’ll get some flak for this, but displacement hulls, by their very nature, are not as fast as planing hulls. They may “feel” faster in a section, but without the release, they are constantly dragging more than a sharp edged board would. Now this is not a bad thing. The feeling of a well balance hull is one of the great pleasures of surfing that most people fail to credit. Surfing one well takes a different approach, especially if you are stepping off a thruster. Single fin riders tend to have an easier time.

Another thing I’ll take flak for, and I’m saying it anyway, Greg Liddle did not invent the displacement hull surfboard. He refined it to an amazing degree, made it work in a short package, championing it when it was completely against the trends of the time, but have you ever seen a Weber Foil? Have you ever really looked at almost any board before the mid sixties? All displacement hulls, although arguably not “modified transitional displacement hulls”, whatever that means. Please don’t take this as me dissing Greg Liddle. On the contrary, I think his boards are brilliant and have been a huge design influence for me. It’s just I get a little frustrated when I here people talk about hull this and hull that, without any understanding of what a hull is.

Thanks

 

I’m Coming East!

I’ll be bringing these two boards, plus my personal 7’3″ hillbilly hull East next week.

The mango one is a 6’10” hillbilly hull. This board is a blend of Liddle style Malibu hull with a bonzerish, Frye style mid to tail contour. Step forward and drive it like a hull, but step back and feel the drive and projection of a bonzer.

The gray one is a 5’8″ HPH/speedster. Based on the Bob Simmons/Lindsay Lord hydrodynamic planing hull concept, but foiled out and dialed in for speed.

I’ll be showing these to the friendly folks at Cinnamon Rainbows and Corduroy over the weekend so if you’d like to get a closer look, contact me and I’ll let you know where and when.

kookbox nerd fodder

Okay, I’m a nerd, so here goes. One of the factories that produced Blake paddle boards (some have claimed the nicest examples) was Robert Mitchell Manufacturing Company in Cincinnati, Ohio. They were an extremely large furniture manufacturer. Apparently Tom met one of the family in Florida and it went from there. These boards were furniture quality and I’ve read mostly went to the East coast and Hawaii.

I found this article while researching the boards made here in Cincinnati.

hulls

hulls

I’ve been on a quest for the perfect hull for San Diego for several years. As a result I’ve reached some conclusions about various combinations of belly and concaves. Now I know a lot of people are going to holler about real hulls having no concave. Maybe they’re right and once you start putting concaves in it’s no longer a hull. I happen to call my variant the “hillbilly hull”. Under that general designation I have shaped a variety of planshapes and bottoms. Always staring with a nice roll in the nose. Malibu style dictates a somewhat flattish middle and tail and results in a very fun hull that you can read all about on Greg Liddle’s websight.

Now it gets interesting. When I’ve introduced a bit of concave to double concave towards the back, I’ve noticed more accelleration off the bottom and while kind of pumping down the line (not thruster style wiggling but more like weighting and unweighting a transition while pool skating). The more extreme the concaves the more bonzerish squirt there is. The boards still turn and drive from your front foot but are capable of surfing off the tail as well.

Now when the concave is started further forward again, you start losing the front foot driven goodness that is the hallmark of a good hull. You can still move forward and pump down the line but real cutbacks need a tail weighted bias. The plus side is a fast, glidey board that’s more in tune with the San Diego spots I frequent (Tourmaline, Cliffs, Pipes).

I used to call these boards little eggs, fried eggs, or little fried eggs depending on the combination of belly and concaves and I may go back to doing so. I have one of each and love them all equally depending on the day. If you spot me in the lot at Swami’s or Tourmaline, holler at me and you are welcome to test drive anything I have in the van.

Peace

my personal 7’11” hillbilly hull

One of the earlier hillbilly hulls, shaped in 2004. I had shaped three boards from a 70s Frye egg that all surfed well but had too much tail width for anything approaching overhead. So I pulled in the tail and gave it more of a thinman nose and contoured the bottom with what is now my standard hillbilly hull bottom; belly-concave-double concave. There’s a lot of edge at the tail for release and a very flat rocker, especially down the center. This is easily the fasted board I’ve ever had and works from knee high Tourmaline to double overhead Cliffs.